SOLVING PUBLIC PROBLEMS WITH DATA

An Introduction to Data Science and Data Analytical Thinking in the Public Interest
A series of online lectures by leading experts from the Governance Lab
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By 2018, the United States alone could face a shortage of 140,000 to 190,000 people with deep analytical skills as well as 1.5 million managers and analysts with the know-how to use the analysis of big data to make effective decisions.

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The world’s national, state and local governments don’t have the right digital skills in the right quantities to meet the challenges of the coming century. This is a Big Problem. 

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Deep questions remain about the ability for many areas of government and civil society to identify, cultivate and retain individuals with the necessary skills for success in a world increasingly driven by information technology.

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The shortage of data scientists is becoming a serious constraint in some sectors.

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We have tons of data; we are insight poor

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Leaders in every sector will have to grapple with the implications of big data, not just a few data-oriented managers.

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What sort of personality makes for an effective data scientist? Definitely curiosity…. The biggest question in data science is ‘Why?’ Why is this happening? If you notice that there’s a pattern, ask, ‘Why?’ Is there something wrong with the data or is this an actual pattern going on? Can we conclude anything from this pattern? A natural curiosity will definitely give you a good foundation.

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There’s a digital revolution taking place both in and out of government in favor of open-sourced data, innovation, and collaboration.

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LEARN FROM LEADING DATA EXPERTS

Access knowledge and know-how from data experts in a variety of organizations and institutions.

TODAY, KNOWING HOW TO WORK WITH DATA MATTERS MORE THAN EVER.

Watch Data Scientist Ben Wellington explain why:
READY TO USE YOUR DATA TO ACHIEVE YOUR PUBLIC MISSION?
Click on a tile below to watch any lecture. The lectures vary in length from 25 to 60 minutes. Each lecture includes selected readings and links to additional resources.

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